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Chocolate Pomegranate Tart

Chocolate Pomegranate Tart

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The first few times I saw the chocolate-pomegranate combination, I scoffed. I like chocolate and I like fruit, but I do not like them together. No, siree!

But I decided to give a whirl anyway, and boy, am I glad! In this dessert, the tart pomegranate syrup and fresh seeds provide the perfect contrast to the rich chocolate and sweet shortbread crust. I highly recommend it!


Why pomegranate seeds? It’s customary to eat pomegranate on Rosh Hashanah, symbolizing our wish to have a year full of good deeds, as a pomegranate is filled with luscious seeds.

The tart has four layers. There’s the crust, the chocolate ganache filling, the sticky pomegranate syrup and then the seeds.


The crust dough will be quite greasy, but don’t worry. Press it into the bottom and up the sides of the pan, and make sure to prick it several times with a fork. Bake it for approximately 30 minutes, until golden in color.


It’s important to use good quality dark chocolate for the ganache filling. Put the chocolate and coconut milk in a small saucepan over a low flame until the chocolate melts. Whisk it until mixture is smooth and silky. Add in sugar and vanilla, and pour into full cooled tart crust. Put the tart in the refrigerator to set.

The pomegranate syrup is probably the trickiest part. Pour the pomegranate juice into a saucepan and add the sugar. Bring to a boil. Lower to a very gentle simmer and cook down until it is syrupy and reduced by at least half—approximately 30–45 minutes.

Pour syrup over the set chocolate ganache, sprinkle with pomegranate seeds and return to refrigerator until ready to serve.


I don’t suggest leaving out any of the layers, because then it may taste unbalanced. The chocolate is very rich; the pomegranate syrup, very tart. Together, they work.

Tip for deseeding a pomegranate: Do it under water! Cut the pomegranate into quarters and put them into a bowl of water. Use your hands to pop out the seeds and discard the shell. In the bowl, the seeds will sink and the white part will float. Remove the white, drain the water, and you have beautiful, clean seeds. This method also prevents mess and staining.


Crust:

  • 1 cup margarine, melted
  • 6 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. kosher salt
  • 2½ cups flour
  1. Use an 8″ × 11″ tart pan with a removable bottom.
  2. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  3. Mix the melted margarine with the sugar. Add vanilla, salt and flour and mix until it reaches cookie dough consistency (mixture will be quite greasy).
  4. Gently press the dough into the bottom and up the sides of the tart tin. Prick the dough with a fork and bake at 350° F for 30 minutes. Crust should be golden in color.

Ganache:

  • 1 cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 8 oz. good quality dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  1. Pour the coconut milk into a small saucepan. Add the chopped dark chocolate and let it sit over a very low flame until chocolate begins to melt.
  2. Stir gently until chocolate is fully melted and mixture combines evenly. Add the sugar and stir.
  3. Pour the ganache into the baked tart crust. Refrigerate until chocolate is completely set.

Pomegranate Syrup and Garnish:

  • 2 cups pomegranate juice
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • Seeds of 1 pomegranate
  1. In a small saucepan, combine the pomegranate juice and sugar. Bring to a boil. Lower to a gentle simmer and cook until the mixture is syrupy and reduced by at least half.
  2. Pour mixture over the chocolate, and top with the pomegranate seeds. Refrigerate until the syrup is set. Then cover and refrigerate until serving.

Yields: 20 servings


Have you seen my apple-honey-pomegranate pavlova recipe? If you don’t like chocolate, I suggest you try that instead. Alternatively, you can make both! The meringue shell is filled with vanilla honey cream, topped with tart apples and drizzled with a pomegranate coulis. Go for it!


What’s on your Rosh Hashanah menu?


Miriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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Anonymous August 29, 2017

can the coconut milk be substituted for coconut cream? if yes would amount be the same? Reply

k October 26, 2014

How long does it usually take for the ganache to set? Reply

Miriam Szokovski October 1, 2014

crust Pie crust and tart crust are not the same. I wouldn't use graham cracker crust, it's very different. If you can find something pre-made that has a similar texture (it's more a cookie/shortbread texture), it should work well. Reply

Anonymous September 23, 2014

instead of making the tart crust, could I use a premade pie crust? And, also do you think it would be interesting to use a gram cracker crust? Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 21, 2014

substituting 1. you could substitute the coconut milk but the filling doesn't taste at all like coconut.

2. almond flour - you could use this recipe:

1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
3 cups almond flour
4 Tablespoons coconut oil
¼ tsp salt
4 Tablespoons pure Maple Syrup

bake until golden

3. you could definitely use pomegranate molasses instead. Reply

Anonymous September 21, 2014

Can I use pomegranate molasses instead of boiling Dow juice? Reply

Tzvia Belgium September 21, 2014

This looks interesting and i'd like to try it, but can the coconut milk be substituted for creamer for instance, those who don't like coconut?
thanks alot
Tzvia Reply

Anonymous New Haven September 21, 2014

Substitutions This sounds delish, any chance I could sub almond flour for the crust and stevia for the sugar? Would love to make this but we're grain free and mostly sugar free... Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 16, 2014

Freezing If you're freezing it, add the fresh pomegranate seeds after you've taken it out. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 16, 2014

Hi Janet - yes to both! Reply

Janet Levy Surrey, BC Canada September 16, 2014

Chocolate Pomegranate Tart Recipe This looks like a fabulous Rosh Hashanah receipe and I want to try it. Do you use a pan with a removable bottom and will this tart freeze so it can be made ahead of time?

With thanks. Reply

Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
Miriam SzokovskiMiriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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