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Cook It Kosher

Passover Vegan Instant Ice Cream

Passover Vegan Instant Ice Cream

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Passover has become known as “The Holiday of the Food Processor” (or, if it hasn’t, it should be). So, how about a super-quick and easy food processor recipe which gives you creamy, completely healthy, vegan, delicious ice cream?


“Banana Soft Serve” has been making the rounds on the Internet as a healthy alternative to traditional ice cream for a couple of years, and after several failed attempts in my not-particularly-powerful blender, I’ve finally whipped up a few beautiful batches in my lovely new food processor.

It might seem like a nuisance to take out your food processor just for this, but that’s what makes this recipe perfect for Passover. Most of us have our food processors out (and going!) for most of the holiday and pre-holiday cooking spree, so when you need a quick break—rinse it out, throw in some frozen fruit, and voila: Banana Blackberry Ice Cream!


Start by freezing a bunch of overripe peeled bananas. The browner they are, the sweeter and creamier your ice cream will be. Stick some of the bananas into the food processor and pulse until crumbly. Stop the food processor and use a spatula to push the batter from the sides back down onto the bottom of the bowl. Continue pulsing until the mixture turns soft and creamy.


Take out half and eat it plain, or throw in a handful of chopped almonds or pistachios for texture. Now, for the rest, throw in some frozen fruit (I chose blackberries and a squeeze of lemon juice) and pulse for another minute or so until smooth. You can try it with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries or mango. Or, for a less fruity flavor, mix in some cocoa powder, coffee or nut butter.

The only catch with this ice cream is that it doesn’t maintain its texture when frozen—it really needs to be eaten fresh.


Ingredients:

  • 6 overripe bananas, frozen
  • 1 cup blackberries, frozen
  • 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice (optional)

Directions:

  1. Peel bananas, cut into chunks and freeze. Freeze blackberries.
  2. Put banana into the bowl of your food processor and pulse until crumbly. Using a spoon or a spatula, wipe down the sides of the bowl, pushing the banana batter back into the bowl. Continue pulsing until mixture turns soft and creamy.
  3. Remove half and eat plain, or with a handful of chopped nuts mixed in.
  4. Add blackberries and lemon juice to the remaining ice cream and pulse for another minute or two until smooth.
  5. Remove and serve immediately.

Considering that this ice cream is just plain fruit, there’s really no bad time to make it. Make it for breakfast, for a snack, or for a late-night treat. Good for kids, adults, and everyone in between.

Have you ever made banana ice cream? Can you picture yourself making it over Pesach? What’s your favorite flavor?



Miriam Szokovski is the author of historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She enjoys tinkering with recipes, and teaches cooking classes to young children. Miriam shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher and in the N'shei Chabad Newsletter.
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Discussion (10)
March 18, 2013
I don't get the restriction on only having veggies and fruit you peel. Makes no sense what's so ever. Glad I'm Sephardic and do not have those restrictions!
Viv
Tampa
March 18, 2013
I make this all the time. It's ok for diabetics as well because its all natural sugars. You won't have a sugar spike at all.
Viv
Tampa
March 10, 2013
For those who only use peel-able fruit on Passover, you can make this with mango, kiwi, honeydew, cantaloupe, very ripe pears, pineapple, peaches, nectarines, etc.

But keep in mind - this recipe is great year-round! So if it doesn't work for you on Passover, try it some other time!
Miriam Szokovski
March 7, 2013
I buy big strawberries and peel them
Ayala
Argentina
March 7, 2013
Like it :)
Healthy and tasty!
Anonymous
March 6, 2013
Rose - you are correct. Bananas are highest in carbs among fruits. A large one has approx. 30g. I would recommend a Salter food scale. It has codes for all fruits (and many other foods) to determine carbohydrates. I use it when cooking for my diabetic son and am then able to doee his insulin accordingly.
SZ
March 5, 2013
not good for diabetics...too sweet...i need to know how much carb. each serving has & 1/2 cup???
rose schonberger
ny,usa
March 5, 2013
other fruit
Pineapple sliced frozen.when in mood for dessert let them thaw for 10 or 15 min so you don't break the processor. Follow same as for bananas, do the same with mango peaches or plums. If your custom is to peel all fruits and veggies on Pesach skip the berries.

If you want to serve a few flavors together put it in freezer until the others are ready. You could freeze ahead take out dessert at the beginning of the meal and keep in fridge until serving time.
Chaya S
CT
March 4, 2013
other fruits
i guess one can use ripe nectarines or peaches or plums instead
Anonymous
ch
March 3, 2013
I look forward to trying this out
Since I peel my fruits and veggies, not sure how the blackberries would work out though...:)))
zs
brooklyn
Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
Miriam SzokovskiMiriam Szokovski is the author of historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She enjoys tinkering with recipes, and teaches cooking classes to young children. Miriam shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher and in the N'shei Chabad Newsletter.
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