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Cook It Kosher

For some people these egg "noodles" will evoke all sorts of childhood Passover memories, but if you've never come across them, allow me to introduce you.


Since flour-based noodles are out on Passover, many people make thin crepe-like pancakes out of eggs, which they then roll up and cut into strips, forming kosher-for-Passover noodles (Lokshen, in Yiddish) which taste marvelous in chicken soup. The thinner they are, the better they taste.

Note: Some people add potato starch, but I haven't included any in this recipe since I find it unnecessary.

Ingredients:

  • 6 eggs
  • ½ cup water
  • kosher salt
  • 2-3 tablespoons oil

Directions:

  1. Beat the eggs and salt. Slowly add the water and keep beating until fluffy.
  2. Heat 1-2 tablespoons oil in a frying pan. Swirl to coat the pan.
  3. Pour in just enough of the mixture to cover the bottom of the pan. Cook 1-2 minutes, then gently flip and cook 1 minute more. (Amount of batter and cook time will vary depending on the size of your pan.)
  4. Tip egg "pancake" out of the pan and onto a cutting board. Cut into thin strips.
  5. Repeat until egg mixture has all been used.
  6. Serve in soup.

Last week's almond butter recipe was in preparation for this easy, 4-ingredient, gluten-free, kosher-for-Passover cookie.


The best part about these is how easy they are and how well they freeze.




If you want to fancy 'em up, you can melt some chocolate and drizzle it over.

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Pour the almond butter and sugar into a bowl and mix. Add the egg and the salt, and mix.
  2. Use a 1 tablespoon measuring spoon to scoop out even-sized balls of dough. Roll them gently and place on inch apart on a parchment paper lined baking sheet. Gently press down with a fork to flatten the dough.
  3. Bake at 350° F (180° C) for 10-12 minutes.

NOTE: The cookies will be extremely soft when they come out of the oven. If you try to move them, they will fall apart. Wait for them to cool fully before removing from the pan. Once cool, they will hold together properly.

Yields: 15 cookies

Freezes well.


Despite knowing how easy it is to make homemade nut butters I put it off for years. Last Passover I finally gave it a go, and I must concur with everyone who's said it previously—there's absolutely no comparison to the store-bought stuff.


This recipe is for almond butter, but you can use the same process with peanuts, cashews, or pistachios.



Note: Next week's recipe will be an easy, 4-ingredient Passover cookie using this (or store-bought, if you must!) almond butter.

But you don't have to use it only on Passover. It's delicious on toast, crackers, rice cakes, or add a teaspoon to your smoothies for a nutty undertone.


Ingredients:

  • 2 cups roasted almonds
  • 1-2 tbsp. canola oil [NOTE: on Pesach use safflower oil]
  • salt
  • 1-2 tbsp. honey (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C).
  2. Spread the almonds out on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt. Bake for 5-6 minutes (when they smell toasty, they are ready.) NOTE: If using raw almonds, bake for 10-15 minutes.
  3. Pour the almonds into the bowl of a food processor and run for 5-10 minutes, stopping to scrape down the sides every few minutes. Amount of time will vary, depending on the strength of your food processor.) When the almonds have formed a paste, add the honey (optional) and oil to smooth it out. Salt to taste.
  4. Store in a glass jar in the refrigerator.

Yields: 1 cup almond butter


I've been wanting to play around with tofu for a while now, and a stir-fry seemed like a good place to start because there are so many other textures and flavors—the tofu is but a small part. I can't say I'm completely on board with tofu's texture, but the flavor of the sauce in this stir fry is outstanding, and the tofu becomes almost like a crouton that you can either enjoy or pick out. Of course, you can replace it with chicken if you prefer.


Feel free to play around with the vegetables. You can use almost any combination with good results.


Most people typically pair stir-fry with white, brown, or fried rice, but here I've used barley. Any grain that will soak up the sauce can work and it's fun to play around with different ones—millet, farro, and quinoa will all work too.


Stir-Fry Ingredients:

  • 14 oz. tofu
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 4 carrots
  • 4 small heads baby bok choy
  • 1 lb. button mushrooms
  • 2-3 scallions
  • 1 purple onion
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews
  • 2-4 tablespoons oil

Sauce Ingredients:

  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. mirin
  • ¼ cup honey (optional: replace with brown sugar)
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ cup oil
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 one-inch (approx) chunks of ginger

Directions:

  1. Whisk the sauce ingredients together and set aside.
  2. Press and drain your tofu. Cut into cubes and coat with the flour.
  3. Peel the carrots. Discard peels. Use the peeler to cut the rest of each carrot into ribbons.
  4. Slice the mushrooms, onions, and scallions. Was the baby bok choy and separate the leaves. Depending on the size of the leaves, you may wish to cut them.
  5. Heat the oil in a wok or non-stick skillet and fry the tofu until golden brown. Add the sliced vegetables and saute until bright and just cooked through but still crunchy. Add ¼ cup of the sauce and cook a few minutes more. Add half the cashews immediately before removing from the pan.
  6. Serve over rice, barley, quinoa or any other grain. Drizzle with additional sauce when serving (optional) and garnish with remaining cashews.

Yields: 6 servings

Adapted from a recipe on Pinch of Yum.


Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
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