Here's a great tip:
Enter your email address and we'll send you our weekly magazine by email with fresh, exciting and thoughtful content that will enrich your inbox and your life, week after week. And it's free.
Oh, and don't forget to like our facebook page too!
Contact Us
 Email
Jewish Art for the Soul

By Davora Lilian

Acrylic
Acrylic

Artist's Statement: Bringing color to the Jewish nation is the goal of Art for the Soul. Chassidic music has been elevated to a very high level but is still black and white. I dream of seeing Chabad mitzvah vans in color as well as the large Menorahs! Lets bring color to the Jewish nation!

Acrylic on Canvas
Acrylic on Canvas

Artist's Statement: When we have Bitachon (trust), we feel confident that G‑d is taking care of us and guarding us at every moment. This knowlege further connects us to Him.

By Shayna Denburg

Acrylic on Canvas
Acrylic on Canvas

Artist’s Statement: What is inside is real. The outside is just a mask, a shell.

By Sara Seldowitz

Paper Collage
Paper Collage

Artist's Statement: A Jewish couple under the chuppah (marriage canopy) is the beginning of a new family and entity; a holy moment that links generations of Jews together. We know from the Chassidic masters that the couple's deceased ancestors are spiritually present at this special and joyful time.

By Adar Darnov

Graphite and Gouache
Graphite and Gouache

Artist's Statement: This is my interpretation of Rabbi Yisroel Glick. I met him while drawing at Chabad of Midtown Manhattan. The stylization and color choices represent the side of Judaism that is beyond physical reality.

Oil on Paper
Oil on Paper

Artist's Statement: This is a mono-type, a one-of-a-kind process which allows me to create a free and imaginative description of the sanctification of the moon. Allusions to the custom float around the moon.

By Devorah Weinberg

Oil on Canvas
Oil on Canvas

Artist's Statement: This painting was based on a photograph taken in the Warsaw Ghetto. I was very touched by the subject's passion and ecstasy juxtaposed with the surrounding poverty. The painting represents the love and strong connection to Judaism that existed in this bygone era.

Watercolor
Watercolor

Artist’s Statement: Hamantashen. Triangles. Magen David. Purim. Hmmm.

By Israel Noach Sauer

Oil, Acryllic, Collage on Canvas.
Oil, Acryllic, Collage on Canvas.

Artist's Statement: Chassidic thought teaches that despite the harshness of some of the laws, we need to view the positive within them, and enjoy the boundaries the Torah sets.

By Dovid Orlansky

Mixed Media
Mixed Media

Artist's Statement: Ana B’Koach is a prayer which represents the hidden side of G‑d's protection. Blessings are not always directly manifest in our lives, but with more direct observation we begin to make out G‑d's veiled blessings. It is our hope that we can glimpse the truth, until we can see the actual light for what it is.

By Shayna Denburg

Acrylic on Metal
Acrylic on Metal

Artist's Statement: Being in Jerusalem is hard to explain. It's a feeling of belonging more certain than anything I have ever known. I'm there and I fit. When I painted this, I had been in Jerusalem for a couple of weeks and felt like I needed to leave something of me there. And there it is.

By Devorah Weinberg

Oil on Canvas
Oil on Canvas

Artist's Statement: This painting, which depicts a man blowing a shofar, has the Hebrew word "Aneini" - "Answer me," in the background. The work is meant to represent the universal cry of the soul to G‑d, "Answer me!"

Watercolor on Paper
Watercolor on Paper

Artist's Statement: We read in Tanya that Torah study connects us to G‑d with both an inner light (ohr penimi) and with an encompassing light (ohr makif).

By Bentzion Elisha

Digital Retouching and Art Utilizing Photoshop and Lightroom
Digital Retouching and Art Utilizing Photoshop and Lightroom

Artist’s Statement: Every holy man has a holy woman behind him, and the Rebbetzin was the holy woman behind the Rebbe. This royal daughter, granddaughter, great-granddaughter, and wife of the Rebbe was described as “indescribable” even by her own husband, the Rebbe, who commented after her passing that only G‑d knows of her true greatness.

In her famous signature of modesty, we have only a few glimpses to her likeness. The most famous one is a cropped picture taken of her at a wedding reception. I felt this wrinkled old picture deserved a little more attention to highlight this great woman. This is a creative suggestion of how she might have looked in her youth, based on the original black-and-white image.

Creative works exploring life and Judaism composed by a spectrum of Jewish artists.

"The primary talent of an artist is his ability to step away from the externalities of the thing and, disregarding its outer form, gaze into its innerness and perceive its essence, and to be able to convey this in his painting.This is how an artist can serve his Creator." — The Rebbe


Related Topics
This page in other languages